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Vitamin B Assessment Profile (B1, B2, B3, B5, B6)
    Close Vitamin B Assessment Profile (B1, B2, B3, B5, B6)

    Vitamin B Assessment Profile (B1, B2, B3, B5, B6)

    Product Code: LVBAs

    Price: $316.00

     
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    Test Description

    Vitamin B Assessment Profile (B1, B2, B3, B5, B6)

    Profile Includes Vitamins B1, B2, B3, B5, B6

    Vitamin B1 (Thiamine)

    Vitamin B1 is also known as thiamine. It is essential in energy production as thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). It is very important for carbohydrate metabolism and is involved in many metabolic functions. It is necessary for the synthesis of RNA and fat. It is involved in nerve transmission in the peripheral nervous system and the brain. It is a strong antioxidant and increases the ability of vitamins E and B6 to destroy free radicals, or oxidants. It is found in brewer's yeast, peas, pork, wheat germ, macaroni, peanuts, whole grains, beans and liver.

    A deficiency of thiamine may result in loss of appetite, fatigue, depression, constipation, confusion, poor coordination, and nervous degeneration. The classical deficiency disease is Beri-Beri. Alcoholics often show a B1 deficiency. The RDA for thiamine is 1.2 mg. A supplemental level is 2 to 100 mg. There is no toxic dose listed for thiamine.

    The methodology is a HPLC method modified and developed in our laboratory. The normal value established in our laboratory for red blood cell vitamin B1 (thiamine) is 33 to 110 ╡g/L.

    Specimen is 2.0 mL of washed heparinized RBCs. Collect the sample in a heparin tube. Centrifuge the tube, then wash the RBCs one time with normal saline. Protect from light and ship in amber plastic tube.

    Vitamin B2 (Riboflavin)

    Vitamin B2 is also known as riboflavin. Riboflavin is essential in energy production as FAD. It is important in the synthesis and breakdown of fats. It activates the vitamins B6 and folic acid. It is also important in the synthesis of corticosteriods, red blood cells and glycogen. It is found in Brewer's yeast, liver, meat, broccoli, dairy products, wheat germ, poultry, and whole grain products.

    A deficiency of riboflavin is associated with skin problems especially around the nose, mouth, and ears. In addition, a patient may have a "smooth tongue," redness, burning and excessive tearing of the eyes, light sensitivity, anemia, personality changes and cataracts. The RDA for riboflavin is 1.3 mg. A supplemental level is suggested as 1.7 to 50 mgs. There is no toxic dose listed for riboflavin.

    The methodology is a HPLC method modified and developed in our laboratory. The normal value established in our laboratory for red blood cell vitamin B2 is 2.8 to 20 ug/L.

    Specimen is 2.0 mL of washed heparinized RBCs. Collect the sample in a heparin tube. Centrifuge the tube, then wash the RBCs one time with normal saline. Protect from light and ship in amber plastic tube.

    Vitamin B3 (Niacin)

    Niacin, like the other B vitamins, is necessary for energy production (NAD). It is important in the synthesis of DNA, fatty acids and cholesterol. It is also important in brain function. Niacin is found in brewer's yeast, liver, poultry, peanuts, fish, whole grains, eggs and milk. The nicotinic acid form may dilate blood vessels and cause a "flush."

    A deficiency of niacin may result in inflamed and discolored skin (dermatitis), diarrhea and depression (the three "D's" of Pellagra). Headaches, elevated blood lipids and fatigue may also occur. The RDA for niacin is 16 mgs. A suggested supplemental level is 20 to 1000 mgs. Levels of 3000 mgs have been stated to be toxic.

    The methodology is a fluorescent method. The normal range established in our laboratory is 1.2 to 2.9 ug/mL.

    Specimen requires 4.0 mL of whole blood collected in a heparin tube. Protect from light, freeze and ship in an amber plastic tube. Vitamin B3 is also known as niacin, nicotinic acid and niacinamide. The sample is 4.0 mL of blood collected in a heparin tube. Protect from light and ship in an amber plastic tube.

    Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid )

    This is a water-soluble vitamin that is part of the B complex. It is involved in a number of essential functions in the body and is an essential part of coenzyme A (CoA), an important catalyst in the metabolism of fats, carbohydrates and proteins in energy production. It is essential for the production of cholesterol, steroids, and fatty acids and aids in the utilization of other vitamins, especially riboflavin. About 33% to 50% of panthothenic acid is lost in cooking and milling of whole grains into flour. It helps in maintaining a healthy cardiovascular system, adrenal support, and healthy joints. There is no toxic level for this vitamin as it is excreted in the urine. No RDA has been established for panthothenic acid, but 4 to 7 mgs is considered adequate. The richest sources of pantothenic acid are liver and other organ meats, whole grain bread and cereals, brewer's yeast, legumes, fish and poultry.

    Methodology is by HPLC. The procedure was developed in our laboratory. The accepted normal range established in our laboratory is: 10 to 36 mg/dL.

    Specimen is 2.0 mL of washed heparinized RBCs. Collect the sample in a heparin tube. Centrifuge the tube, then wash the RBCs one time with normal saline. Protect from light and ship in amber plastic tube.

    Vitamin B6 (Pyridoxine)

    Vitamin B6 is also called pyridoxine and erythrocyte AST/EGOT. There are three natural forms: pyridoxine (pyridoxal), pyridoxamine and pyridoxal. B6 is necessary for protein metabolism; conversion of linoleic acid to arachidonic acid; glycogen breakdown; the synthesis of brain neurotransmitters, niacin, antibodies, RBCs, DNA and elastin; and glycogen synthesis. Decreased levels lead to poor wound healing, depression, skin problems, anemia, fatigue, convulsive seizures, stunted growth, erratic blood glucose levels.

    B6 is found in soybeans, oysters, meat, chicken, tuna, lima beans, avocado, walnuts, peanuts, and salmon. The RDA for B6 is 1.7 mg. A suggested supplemental level is 2 to 100 mg.

    The normal value established in our laboratory for B6 is 39% to 89% saturation.

    Specimen is 2.0 mL of 3-time washed heparinized RBCs. Collect the sample in a heparin tube. Centrifuge the tube, then wash the RBCs 3 times with normal saline. Protect from light and ship in amber plastic tube.



    Doctors who wish to order kits, please call our lab directly to set up an account before ordering. 316-684-7784

    Test Details

    Process time: 5 to 7 business days

    Process method: The methodology is by HPLC for B1, B2, B5, B6 . The methodology is a fluorescent method for Vitamin B3.

    CPT code: 84425; 84252; 84591; 84207

    Special instructions: See instructions for Vitamins B1, B2, B3, B5 & B6.

    Collection Instructions

    Patient prep: None

    Results

    Normal values:

    The accepted normal range established in our laboratory are:

    Vitamin B1: 33 to 110 ╡g/L.
    Vitamin B2: 2.8 to 20 ug/L.
    Vitamin B3: 1.2 to 2.9 ug/mL.
    Vitamin B5: 10 to 36 mg/dL
    Vitamin B6: 39% to 89% saturation.

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